Premium Airport Services Provider To Add Flexible Workspace To Its Offerings

Plaza Premium Group’s CEO, Song Hoi-see, previously owned the flexible workspace brand Business Centers Plaza.
  • Plaza Premium Group, a Hong Kong-based airport services provider, is considering opening collaborative workspaces in airports around the world.
  • Though not a new concept, company CEO Song Hoi-see seeks to disrupt traditional airport services by adding a more personalized workspace experience.
  • Hoi-see is no stranger to the flexible workspace industry, having previously owned Business Centers Plaza in Asia.

The South China Morning Post reported this week that Hong Kong-based premium airport services provider, Plaza Premium Group (PPG), is “exploring the possibility of opening collaborative workspaces in airports around the world.”

Over the past couple of years, we’ve seen the flexible workspace industry move beyond traditional office buildings. There are now flexible workspace offerings in retail properties, hotels, gyms, and airports.

Regus and VARIDESK are two companies that, like PPG, have realized the added value that coworking spaces can offer travellers. VARIDESK opened a coworking space in Dallas Fort-Worth airport, while Regus has opened workspace locations in several airports, including Gatwick, Dublin, Brussels, Luxembourg, Copenhagen, and others.

Yet, flexible workspace operators eyeing airport locations will also compete with airlines and airport services providers like PPG. Though not a full workspace, New York’s LaGuardia Airport recently introduced the Jabbrrbox, a silent workspace that can be rented by the half hour. Frankfurt Airport also offers flexible workspace in Terminal 1 (though contracts are given on a one-month minimum).

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Song Hoi-see, founder and CEO of Plaza Premium Group, seeks to disrupt traditional airport services by adding a product that’s personalized. Speaking to the South China Morning Post, Hoi-see argued that “the trouble with airports is they provide monotonous products” and that there is no difference from one airport to another.

PPG’s flexible workspace offering in airports will target business travellers who might not have the frequent flier status to access business lounges. Hoi-see reportedly envisages PPG’s shared workspaces with “a lot of digital interactive offerings and healthy food” at an affordable price.

The company has put forward a proposal to the operator of Hong Kong International Airport and it said it would need between 7,000 and 8,000 square feet of space to develop its shared workspace vision.

Hoi-see is no stranger to the flexible workspace industry, having previously owned Business Centers Plaza in Asia prior to focusing on airport lounges and services.

As technology continues to empower people to work from anytime, anywhere, professionals will become regular travellers that, even when traveling for pleasure, will require some sort of workspace. It’s likely then that we will see flexible workspace offerings become more widespread across international airports.

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