Are You Making This Common Mistake with Your Coworking Space Website?

Coworking community - photo by Cat Johnson

There’s an understandable temptation among coworking space owners and operators to showcase the beautiful furniture and interior design of their space. Websites are full of images of gorgeous cafe areas, hip offices and envy-inducing meetings rooms, with no people in them.

What potential members are looking for in a workspace, however, is not necessarily a beautiful design. A well-designed space is nice to look at, but if you’re relying on interior design to attract members, you might find yourself in trouble.

Coworking spaces thrive when members thrive, and members thrive when they are engaged, connected and valued.

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Rather than trying to appeal to someone’s design sensibilities, show them the vibrant community they could join by including photos of people working and engaging in your space.

Here are some ideas of photos to include:

  • People working independently in the community space
  • A small group collaborating on a project
  • People interacting in the kitchen or coffee area
  • Celebrations, such as anniversaries and holidays, in the space
  • Recurring, casual events, such as happy hours
  • Members attending Lunch and Learns and in-house workshops
  • Guest presenters in the space
  • Community managers engaging with members
  • Members socializing
  • Group photos of members
  • People doing everyday work in the space
  • Quiet times when members are doing heads-down work
  • Lively times when the space is bustling with energy and excitement
  • People working in different areas of the space
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The idea is to show potential members that there’s a community of professionals already working together, networking, learning, socializing and supporting each other.

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Coworking community - photo by Cat Johnson

Yes, a beautiful interior can be a nice perk of a coworking space, but if that space isn’t full of engaged people who enjoy working in that shared space together, you may have trouble getting others to commit to being in the space.

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All the design features in the world can’t compensate for an empty space or a group of disengaged members.

If you’re shooting your own photos, here are some resources to help you get the best quality possible:

All photos by Cat Johnson